6 Things I’d Change with My Magic Koboko If I Moved Back to Nigeria

Photo Credit: Bayo Omoboriwo Photography

A few months ago, I wrote a post on the reasons I want to move back to home, sweet home. But let’s be real, as much as I have fond memories of home, and miss authentic suya and alladat, there are many reasons why moving back would be real real tough. So today, let’s just pretend that I have a magic koboko that can fix the unfixables. Here are 6 things I’d so badly want to make happen in Nigeria. 

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5 Ways to Thrive in Corporate America – From One Immigrant to Another

Photo by Jopwell

So remember Simsola, the entry-level analyst for whom I wrote a letter called “6 Ways to fake it till you make it in corporate America”? Now she’s been promoted to a mid-level position and she’s totally killing it in her new role. But of course, being the agbaya aunty that I am, I just can’t keep calm. So here I come again with some lessons for Simisola on how to thrive in corporate America, especially as an immigrant climbing the ladder.

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8 Reasons I Want to Move Back to Nigeria

Even after almost 15 years in the U.S., I still sometimes get home sick. But when I think about the frustration that will slap me in the face as soon as I land at Murtala Mohammed airport, real quick I’m like, issorait, I’m good where I am. In fact, over-good is worrying me. My ideal world would combine the best elements of naija with the best elements of the U.S., and then France, plus the islands… and this is me daydreaming into wonderland. For this post, let’s focus on the 8 things I love so much about naija that make me want to move back.

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6 Ways to fake it till you make it in corporate America – from one immigrant to another

Photo: Corporate_curly

The other day at my office, I was going to prepare my Milo concoction (don’t ask!) when I saw Simisola, an entry-level analyst, walking to the break room with her head down the entire time as though she was thinking – “this iya had better not bother me.” Being the agbaya that I am, I tried to engage Simisola in conversation regardless. She gave me quick one-word responses in a shy voice, grabbed her coffee, and speed-walked back to her desk. I smiled, because I used to be just like her. 

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